Music Marketing Interview: L.A. Music Manager Michael Haddad (Part 4)

This 7 part interview with Michael Haddad is an astounding look at the state of the music industry today.

TheRealMusician Recommends:

If you want to take marketing your music to another level, then I can't recommend enough John Oszajca's music marketing manifesto. My favorite aspect of his complete program was his stance on email marketing, where he really leverages the that "1000 true fans" philosophy.

His website is a bit hokey (Flaming guitars? Seriously?), but his program really shows independant artists how to get a leg-up on signed artists.

Learn about how you can promote your band from this incredibly deep and experienced look at the inner workings of the music industry. Be sure to check out all 7 parts, as the whole interview gets quite intense (especially nearing the end!)

It's a Must-Read/Hear for any band looking to make it in the world of music today!

You can see Michael's LA B-roll website here.

Part 1

Part 2

Part 3

Part 4

Part 5

Part 6

Part 7

Read While You Listen

Andrew:
With the rise of other band websites, what do you think the future of Myspace is?

Michael:
People still use Myspace, but it's just become a Music player, and I think it's been a music player for quite some time now.

Andrew:
I know if I want to hear a band, I would look for their Myspace just to hear their tunes, and I don't do anything else on it at all.

Michael:
I used to try and find new music on Myspace as well, but I've stopped doing that now. I find much more new music on Pandora, or stuff like that than ever before.

I would be pretty hard pressed to believe that Myspace would be very viable, unless something really major happens, like if someone bought them out or something like that. If they were to re-tool it it might work. I think it's still decent for you to send a link to a label if you don't have an EPK or anything like that, and that works. But other than that...

Andrew:
With their new interface, I tried using it and it was just so slow. It was more user friendly because you didn't have to custom code it or anything, although that's not a problem for me. I build websites, so custom coding a Myspace page is simple stuff. But I just found it very unusable. In that case, what are your top alternatives to Myspace?

Michael:
I really love ReverbNation. It's a US-based site that is pretty heavily used in North America, and is spanning worldwide.

It has a very simple home page that has everything on it. It has Bio, Songs, Player, the layout is beautiful, it has your management information, it has your website links that are very quick to get to. I just like it overall.

While it may not be really true as far as charts, a band in any city in the world, when they sign up for it and put their music on and whatever other information or video's that they want; they select the genre of their music, and what happens is; as they start gaining visitors and listeners and listeners, and people who sign up and get on their mailing list, and actual song plays; this data starts to accumulate. And they start to determine a chart ranking for their city.

Most bands don't really know how they rank in a major city like Los Angeles. There are a lot of alternative bands here, so here that is a great option. We watch ourselves move up and down the alternative charts in a city like this.

But if you live in a small city in Wyoming, that only has 15,000 people living there (No offense to anyone living there), it's not really that big of an accomplishment to be the #1 band in that city.

In a city like LA, or San Francisco, that is a pretty huge accomplishment because there are a lot of alternative bands here.

Andrew:
And with what you were talking about before, with showing how many hits you've gotten from your Video's or Song plays to a record label, I would assume that these [Reverbnation] stats would have at least some sort of sway with the label.

Michael:
Yeah! Absolutely!

If you are a band in New York, or Chicago, or San Francisco, or LA, and you can maintain a chart range on something like ReverbNation, you can say "Look, we have been between #8 and #21 for 18 weeks or whatever. Well that actually could get you some attention because you don't have to luxury to be on charts, because a small band isn't going to get onto the Top 100 on iTunes, it's just not going to happen, unless they really are selling a lot of units.

Andrew:
They are like mini charts! So being in such a competitive market as LA, where the music scene is huge, there is a ton of bands, and it's cutthroat there. What can a band do to penetrate that, and get their name heard?

Michael:
Well I don't know if there really is one particular secret, Andrew. I think really it takes a lot of things.

What has to happen first is, you need to go back to the basics. This first basic is, The music needs to be made the best as you can possibly make it. Not everybody can do that.

You really really have to dedicated at working at it, and making it sounding phenomenal. You need to best possible recordings that you can get out, and I think those are the basics, along with touring and doing shows in your home city; especially a city as big as LA where you can get so much exposure in such a short period of time.

Andrew:
I'll bet you could even have a tour just in LA, in your home city.

Michael:
Oh yeah! I had a band where we did that, and we overbooked them. We could have booked them 2 or 3 times a week, especially here in Hollywood. And the bigger problem with that, was we just saturated it. Because we couldn't get enough fans to come and see, because they can't handle coming out that often.

At a certain point it becomes overkill. With the music being the best it can be, playing at the right venues and clubs, mixing it up and playing around, and playing in any of the outlining area's and suburbs of LA, that can really help a lot.

Andrew:
I'm really pleased that your emphasis and approach is on creating great music. It's something cool to see rising up right now, and making the best music that is an accurate reflection of who they are.

What would you consider to be more important for the band, the recording or the live performance?

Michael:
I think they are both equally important because the recorded music is the content on the web that people listen to. If you have great recordings, and you promote them and get everyone excited, and then you get ready to go on tour and everybody says "Wow, those are really lackluster shows, they aren't that great", then the band just wasn't ready.

The performances also need to be exceptional. Everything that the band does needs to keep in mind what the reaction is going to be, and how many fans can we gain, and how great can this be; both live and recorded.

You really have to work hard at having a great recording, and a great performance.


Hear the rest of this interview in Part 5!

Part 1

Part 2

Part 3

Part 4

Part 5

Part 6

Part 7

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My name is Andrew Muller. I love creative art, music, television shows, movies, video games, and a good story.

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