Music Marketing Interview: L.A. Music Manager Michael Haddad (Part 5)

This 7 part interview with Michael Haddad is an astounding look at the state of the music industry today.

TheRealMusician Recommends:

If you want to take marketing your music to another level, then I can't recommend enough John Oszajca's music marketing manifesto. My favorite aspect of his complete program was his stance on email marketing, where he really leverages the that "1000 true fans" philosophy.

His website is a bit hokey (Flaming guitars? Seriously?), but his program really shows independant artists how to get a leg-up on signed artists.

Learn about how you can promote your band from this incredibly deep and experienced look at the inner workings of the music industry. Be sure to check out all 7 parts, as the whole interview gets quite intense (especially nearing the end!)

It's a Must-Read/Hear for any band looking to make it in the world of music today!

You can see Michael's LA B-roll website here.

Part 1

Part 2

Part 3

Part 4

Part 5

Part 6

Part 7

Read While You Listen

Andrew:
What point does that [getting yourself on Facebook, Myspace, Reverbnation, Youtube Videos] cross the line from 'I'm so glad that this band is providing me so much content so that I can see more of them and learn more about them' into 'I'm so sick of hearing another thing about this band'.

Michael:
That happens because bands are doing what they're hearing which is sort of the right thing in a lot of ways, which is working for a lot of them, which is about getting content out.

It's not about having content out on 10 different sites, but having exceptional content on a handful of sites, that are all linked and easily manageable. So that you can pull all those fan members, email listings, together into one source. You will have all that data.

If you decide to go to the UK, you say "okay look, we have to accumulate all of our data, we've got to figure out what cities we're going to go to in the UK, where are we going to go in Germany, France; Italy, and Spain. Where is our money best spent?

If we are a DIY band, and are going to do it ourselves, and we're going to raise 30,000 so we can go to the UK, do we have enough fans there?"

It needs to all be streamlined and funneled into one main area. One of the things that I like about ReverbNation, is it takes all that data and pulls it into one.

Andrew:
Does it draw from things like Facebook?

Michael:
It pulls all your fans from Facebook and Myspace into one database.

Andrew:
Well that's actually really exciting.

Michael:
Then what you can do, on your Facebook for example, you can periodically pop-up a link to your ReverbNation, which is a really nice [music] player that integrates really nicely with your Facebook page.

So if you go to one of my Artists' Facebook pages, you'll be able to see the music page, and it will have the ReverbNation player.

Not only does it have the player, but it has tabs with the song listings, bio, management contact, booking contact; anything that is really easy for the band to get out and be in contact.

Andrew:
And it keeps the band from becoming fatigued, or having to go out into all these networks and manage them separately. So as soon as someone learns how to use a program like that, it's all there and they don't have to search. It also keeps the user from becoming fatigued as well.

Michael:
This stuff really has to be streamlined. People really need to make it easy on themselves, because they can get really burned out on it.

Andrew:
What do you think is the more profitable area's for a band to focus on? I hear that album sales, there isn't much of a profit margin after you end up paying all the middle men.

What do you think is more profitable for artists?

Michael:
Well I'm going to let everybody in on a little secret, and this is groundbreaking.

People are not buying records.

They aren't buying CD's. I'm being very sarcastic now. People don't buy CD's, they aren't downloading stuff.

I think that legal downloads are starting to increase, since so much of the pirating and sharing sites are being shut down. So I'm hoping for more legal downloads of units.

I don't think artists can rely on record sales anymore.

I tell my bands now, they will put out a record now and say "Well maybe if we can sell a couple hundred thousand units that would be great". Well you know what, you just cannot bank on that (as much as it might burst their bubbles).

What you have to look at is all the ancillary income. That's the most important thing.

Andrew:
What specifically are you referring to when you say "ancillary income"?

Michael:
Ancillary income is things like merchandise. Like I said, if you aren't selling the concert tickets and getting people into your show, you are not going to have really any merch sales to speak of.

I think there are a lot of other opportunities as well. There are things like licensing for Film and TV, or commercials. Bands can do a lot with that.

I think if they can try and find themselves music supervisors, or a good publisher; a good boutique publisher or a smaller independent publisher who will really go to work for them. Where their music isn't lost in a catalogue of 10 million songs.

Andrew:
So finding people they can rely on, who really know their stuff.

Michael:
Yeah! And I think there are a lot of bands who are trying to get their music out into TV and film, and I think that is a tremendous opportunity. Not only for the exposure, but I think if they then get some sort of a radio hit, they have an opportunity to really see the benefit.

Andrew:
I definitely have been looking more into that. There is a really groundbreaking pop artist that I know, her name is Janelle Monae, and then I go and watch a Toyota ad and I hear her song [Tightrope] and I think "What the heck man? I thought this was some sort of underground pop or something, what's it doing on TV?"

Michael:
Yeah, so she is making money from it. She can get herself licensed, and there are some great opportunities in Film & TV.

Andrew:
Diversifying your income is what's important then.

Michael:
Yeah, I've been to some great seminars, and I've had the opportunity to run in to some really great people; groups like Chop Shop, they find all the music for a lot of these shows.

And I've had the opportunity to talk to a lot of them [shows] personally, and try and understand what it is they're looking for, for these shows. They just aren't pitched properly.

A band needs to have a representative, or a member of the band who is really good at pitching their publisher, or music supervisor, who has a good idea. "Well we know this publisher does a lot of work with these 3 shows, and there are specific lines in two or three of our songs that we think would work really really well for those types of shows.

Andrew:
Who would be that person then? Obviously they could be in the band, but they wanted to hire somebody, who would be that person then?

Michael:
Well if they were to hire somebody, hopefully they have a manager who can help do that. For me, that's what I do. I work with music supervisors and companies that do placement.

Andrew:
In that case, as a music manager, say somebody wanted to go and hire you or another manager because I'm sure with the independent label or DIY mode, there gets to a point where they can't do it themselves anymore. Eventually either you need help to get up there, or you are so far up there that you are too busy to do it yourself.

If somebody were to hire you for example, how does that relationship work? Do you take a certain percentage of what they are making? Do they pay you a flat rate? What types of responsibilities are you expected to have?


To hear what you pay a music manager, their responsibilities to the band, and more, you can hear the rest of this interview in Part 6!

Part 1

Part 2

Part 3

Part 4

Part 5

Part 6

Part 7

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My name is Andrew Muller. I love creative art, music, television shows, movies, video games, and a good story.

If you had to find me somewhere, you would probably find me down at O'neils home cooking eating an organic sweet-potato bun breakfast sandwich with ham.

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